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Hard Drives - Games

Post Date: 2020-11-21

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Badspike13 View Drop Down
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  Quote Badspike13 Quote  Post ReplyReply bullet Topic: Hard Drives - Games
    Posted: 21 Nov 2020 at 10:15am
10 year later (my first DS desktop is now a decade old after some upgrades) I'm configuring another. I play mostly FPS and flight simulators (e.g., IL-2 Sturmovik)

Designing a Lumos. Re: hard drives (based on the recommended configuration of 1 SSD and 1 Seagate). Note: I'm not especially technical.

Am assuming the OS will live on the SSD drive?, so my questions:

1) Recommendations on the best SSD?
2) Better to have two SSDs (vs. one SSD and one Seagate)?
3) If one SSD and one Seagate, should games live on the SSD or Seagate (if SSD, obviously a larger capacity)? Impact on performance either way?

Thanks to all those here!

Coogs

Edited by Badspike13 - 21 Nov 2020 at 10:16am
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Cretae View Drop Down
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  Quote Cretae Quote  Post ReplyReply bullet Posted: 22 Nov 2020 at 7:56am
Not clear, but I assume when you say Seagate, you are talking about a mechanical hard drive?

The best storage option IMO is a smaller M.2 NVMe SSD for your primary (C:) drive, and a SATA SSD for games and apps. Prices are a little askew here versus online, so larger drives are a little pricy.

An M.2 form factor drive plugs directly into a slot on the motherboard, and requires no wires or cables. They work off the PCIe bus like a GPU, and they are therefore 5 times or more faster than a normal SATA SSD. All that killer speed is a blessing when it comes to operating Windows, your maintenance scanning software, your browser, and cloning/backing up your operating system. IMO, you benefit from keeping that small because booting, scanning and cloning happens in very short time spans. you don't really need that extra for loading games and software. if you ever have to do a clean install, you will have to wipe your OS drive completely. If it's on a large drive with all kinds of apps and games, you have to re-install everything.

So, you can save money by getting one of the smaller NVMes and keep it that way, or you can get a !TB one and partition it small for your OS and all that. you can also partition a small NVMe if you want

The second drive where you keep most everything else can be a SATA SSD in any size you want, but above 1TB, they are like I said, pricy. If you can add your own later, just get 1TB and add to it as you need to.

The best NVMe SSD here and just about all over is the Samsung 980 PRO that just arrived here. If you get the smaller one, and you need to save a little cash, get the Seagate Firecuda. It's a bit slower, but you'll never know it.

For secondary storage, get a Samsung 860 EVO in any size you want to pay for.
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  Quote Bob100 Quote  Post ReplyReply bullet Posted: 22 Nov 2020 at 2:57pm
As a flight sim player myself, I can give you a reference point for performance on a Lumos that I received in Oct 2019. I am a DCS player and run that game at max settings on my Lumos and get a very fluid picture on a 1440p monitor.

My Lumos has an Intel i7 9700k, 32GB of 3200MHz Ram, RTX 2070 Super, and a Samsung 1TB 970 EvoPlus.

My cpu and gpu are all outdated now. So, assuming that you configure a Lumos with a more updated & powerful cpu and gpu, you should get outstanding results in IL2.
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  Quote Spartacii Quote  Post ReplyReply bullet Posted: 25 Nov 2020 at 5:57pm
Originally posted by Cretae



An M.2 form factor drive plugs directly into a slot on the motherboard, and requires no wires or cables. They work off the PCIe bus like a GPU, and they are therefore 5 times or more faster than a normal SATA SSD. All that killer speed is a blessing when it comes to operating Windows, your maintenance scanning software, your browser, and cloning/backing up your operating system. IMO, you benefit from keeping that small because booting, scanning and cloning happens in very short time spans. you don't really need that extra for loading games and software. if you ever have to do a clean install, you will have to wipe your OS drive completely. If it's on a large drive with all kinds of apps and games, you have to re-install everything.
 


I totally get the benefits of keeping the OS on one driver and everything else on another, I do the same but there are a couple of things that I'm wondering about this strategy though. If you keep your OS on one drive and your apps/games on another drive, and for whatever reason you need to clean install the OS, wouldn't you still need to re-install everything (app/games) anyways in order to let the OS know (I'm thinking of the registry here) where the apps/games are located and can be found? Or am I missing something?

Also, the other thing that I can think of in regards to keeping the OS in one drive and apps/games in another drive, is in regards to security. I could be totally wrong about this but from what I understand, Windows imposes stricter security rules on any app installed in the usual C:/Program Files or C:/Program Files (x86) folders while loosening those rules if the program is installed in other folders especially other drives.

This last might not be big deal if you are careful in regards to what you install regardless of where you install in and have good security software but its food for thought.

Your answer has me thinking though, besides the OS system itself, what apps if any would you recommend installing on the OS drive?

Thanks.

My DS build consists of a 1TB Samsung 980 Pro 1TB for OS, a 4TB Sabrent Rocket Q4 M2 NVM for apps/games/personal data (almost 3 TB of pics/comics/music/vids/docs) and a 4TB Samsung 860 EVO which I will get on my own as a secondary copy of said personal data.

Of course I don't need that much space for the OS drive but I choose the 1TB Samsung 980 Pro because it has almost twice the Peak Random Read & Write and Sequential Write than the 250GB version. Now I'm wondering what the hell I should use the remaining 750GB worth of space after installing the OS on it.
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  Quote Badspike13 Quote  Post ReplyReply bullet Posted: 26 Nov 2020 at 8:40am
Originally posted by Cretae

Not clear, but I assume when you say Seagate, you are talking about a mechanical hard drive?


Yes, sorry, I meant a mechanical HD, sorry.

Thanks, Cretae, for this detailed response. Most helpful!
Coogs
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  Quote Badspike13 Quote  Post ReplyReply bullet Posted: 26 Nov 2020 at 8:44am
Originally posted by Bob100

As a flight sim player myself.


Thanks, Bob100 for your take on flight simulators and your rig. To be fair, the new machine will be largely for my son, however, I plan to steal it from time-to-time to fly. I'm pretty confident that it will run all IL-2 simulators just fine. Fingers crossed.
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  Quote Badspike13 Quote  Post ReplyReply bullet Posted: 26 Nov 2020 at 8:46am
Originally posted by Spartacii


[QUOTE=Cretae]
An M.2 form factor drive plugs directly into a slot on the motherboard, and requires no wires or cables. They work off the PCIe bus like a GPU, and they are therefore 5 times or more faster than a normal SATA SSD. All that killer speed is a blessing when it comes to operating Windows, your maintenance scanning software, your browser, and cloning/backing up your operating system. IMO, you benefit from keeping that small because booting, scanning and cloning happens in very short time spans. you don't really need that extra for loading games and software. if you ever have to do a clean install, you will have to wipe your OS drive completely. If it's on a large drive with all kinds of apps and games, you have to re-install everything.
 
I totally get the benefits of keeping the OS on one driver and everything else on another, I do the same but there are a couple of things that I'm wondering about this strategy though. If you keep your OS on one drive and your apps/games on another drive, and for whatever reason you need to clean install the OS, wouldn't you still need to re-install everything (app/games) anyways in order to let the OS know (I'm thinking of the registry here) where the apps/games are located and can be found? Or am I missing something?
Also, the other thing that I can think of in regards to keeping the OS in one drive and apps/games in another drive, is in regards to security. I could be totally wrong about this but from what I understand, Windows imposes stricter security rules on any app installed in the usual C:/Program Files or C:/Program Files (x86) folders while loosening those rules if the program is installed in other folders especially other drives.
This last might not be big deal if you are careful in regards to what you install regardless of where you install in and have good security software but its food for thought.
Your answer has me thinking though, besides the OS system itself, what apps if any would you recommend installing on the OS drive?
Thanks.
My DS build consists of a 1TB Samsung 980 Pro 1TB for OS, a 4TB Sabrent Rocket Q4 M2 NVM for apps/games/personal data (almost 3 TB of pics/comics/music/vids/docs) and a 4TB Samsung 860 EVO which I will get on my own as a secondary copy of said personal data.
Of course I don't need that much space for the OS drive but I choose the 1TB Samsung 980 Pro because it has almost twice the Peak Random Read & Write and Sequential Write than the 250GB version. Now I'm wondering what the hell I should use the remaining 750GB worth of space after installing the OS on it.
[/QUOTE

Good questions, thanks Spartacii
Coogs
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  Quote Cretae Quote  Post ReplyReply bullet Posted: 26 Nov 2020 at 11:40am
AFIK, windows would act like you just downloaded that game the first time you start it up again, and look for all the set-up files the game provides. Your saves are almost always in the cloud or in the game files. When I got my newest DS, I brought over a whole HDD full of games from my other computer, and everything worked perfectly first time, and all my saves were there...somewhere.

As far as what to put on there, any app you are concerned about security per your thought. Any productivity app that will benefit from operating at super speed. Anything else you wish.

It's just a suggestion that has worked well for me. My previous computer took several minutes to scan, and I hated the waiting, so I didn't do it as often as I should have. My more compact and much faster NVMe scans often in seconds, and always under 2 minutes.
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